THE IMPORTANCE OF SENSORY PLAY

THE IMPORTANCE OF SENSORY PLAY

Sensory play is an activity that can stimulate the senses; which would be smell, touch, taste or hearing. By stimulating these senses, children are able to develop and strengthen physical and social skills. Sensory play allows children to focus on these senses, it allows children to see how the body can experience the entire world and everything within it.

THE BENEFITS:

BRAIN DEVELOPMENT

Sensory play strengthens nerve connections in the brain, ultimately strengthening your child’s cognitive growth, fine motor skills and development. It can also encourage problem solving as well as independent thinking. 

CALMING SKILLS

Some sensations can be soothing to a small child, by replicating these through sensory play you can begin to learn what also calms down your child. Sensory play can also help with sensitivities, slow exposure to different environments, and allowing them to play with different textures can be helpful to overcome their fears, like picky eating.

RETENTION SKILLS

Sensory play can strengthen information and learning retention. By learning by playing, children are engaged and ready to learn more, and begin to experience what they are playing with.

LANGUAGE SKILLS

Sensory play can also open up a whole new experience for learning new words – what are the textures of things? Hard or soft? Loud or quiet? These encourage new describing words for children, by teaching new describing words of senses, you are ultimately widening their vocabulary.

MEMORY ENHANCEMENT

Whenever you associate a smell, feeling to another play, you are ultimately flooded with memories. The same happens with sensory play when senses are tied to memories, sensory activities can therefore enhance development within the brain.

SENSORY PLAY CAN BE SIMPLE!

You can choose to put together complex sensory bins and experiences – as it is a great way to allow your child to experience sensory play, but sensory play can be simple as well. For strengthening sight, take a walk and let your child point out everything they see – whether it be colour, shapes or objects. With sound try altering your voice between high and low for your child, tapping objects or even making instruments from home. For touch, various fabrics could work, play with water – let your child experience and feel the world. As Long as you bring your child’s attention to the things around them, allow your child to lead the way and guide as they explore the world!